Curriculum Overview

English/Language Arts

Content coming soon. 

Building a solid literacy foundation is crucial for kindergarten students. Therefore, we focus on both reading, writing, speaking and listening in kindergarten. Students will study letters including upper and lower case letters and letter sounds. Students also learn how to use context clues to understand new words, and they work to retell the beginning, middle, and end of stories. Kindergarten students also discuss characters and predict outcomes with prompting. As for writing, our students use a combination of drawing, dictating and writing to narrate a story or a true event. Students also learn how to add details to stories and express thoughts, feelings and ideas clearly when speaking.

Our first grade students build upon their solid reading foundation from Kindergarten and focus on word recognition and analysis, including segmenting and blending phonemes to read unfamiliar words. By the end of the year, our first grade students are reading 100 high frequency words, using context clues to understand new words, and working on their comprehension skills of retelling a story and determining the author’s purpose. Writing also become an integral part of our language arts curriculum in Grade 1. Students will write both narratives and informative pieces while learning the rules for spelling and grammar.
Language arts is one of the core areas of growth in second grade. Our students study vocabulary words and learn to decode unfamiliar words using phonetic and structural analysis. They also study antonyms, synonyms, and homonyms, along with word structure and context clues. In literature, students develop the crucial reading skills of summarizing, previewing text and predicting outcomes, and monitoring comprehension Students work on both narrative and informative writing.
By third grade, we expect all of students to be reading well and able to focus on reading to learn new information. Students learn how to summarize and paraphrase key ideas from both nonfiction and literary texts. Students also respond to literature through writing and discussing. It is essential for students to build rich vocabularies, so we teach students vocabulary both explicitly and through decoding strategies such as phonetic and structural analysis. They also study synonyms, antonyms, and homonyms along with root words and affixes.

Fourth grade students read and work on comparing and contrasting information. They also focus on plot development, character traits, author’s purpose and point of view. IN terms of research students learn to locate and use information in reference materials. Students work on creative writing, poetry, and tall tales. Literature Circles and/or book reports are also integral to the students in fourth-grade.

Our fifth grade students continue to build on their reading skills by adding new strategies and focusing on self-selected texts. Students read from a variety of genres and begin to identify the author’s purpose and point of view. Students also spend time writing and learning the writing process. They explore writing narrative, informative, persuasive, poetry, formal letters, essay responses, and reports while paying careful attention to spelling, punctuation, and grammar.
Sixth grade students study the different genres of literature and respond to fiction, poetry, and nonfiction texts. The focus of this year is also on transitioning from simply reading text to analyzing literature. We focus on critical thinking by making inferences, drawing conclusions, and predicting outcomes. Students study poetic devices and figurative language such as similes, metaphors, and multiple meaning words. Sixth grade students learn how to conduct effective research, avoid plagiarism, and cite sources using MLA format.
Students in seventh grade focus on the writing process, including writing a personal narrative and a piece of persuasive writing. They also focus on literary concepts and genres through the use of selected novels and independently selected novels. Students also focus on expanding their academic vocabularies through our year long word study.
English in eighth grade focuses on the theme of social justice. All students read pieces of literature that connect to this theme, such as Night and To Kill a Mockingbird. Students also continue their study of the writing process with a focus on building skills for researching.

 

Ninth grade students take English I: Introduction to Literature and Rhetoric I and II.  English I is designed to introduce techniques to reinforce and further develop reading, writing, speaking, listening, and critical thinking skills. Students will focus on themes of communication, journey, injustice, culture and human nature using a selection of novels, short stories, plays, poetry, and nonfiction literature.

Tenth grade students take English II-Drama/Poetry I and II. This course is designed to build on the foundational reading, writing, speaking, listening and critical thinking techniques introduced in the freshman year. Students will examine, discuss, and demonstrate specific themes of the human’s response to war, the human’s place in society, human person’s struggle and the power of government using a selection of plays and poetry.

English III-Novel and Short Story I and II. This course is designed to strengthen and advance higher level reading, writing, speaking listening and critical thinking skills. Students respond to assigned readings through class discussions and work to refine oral presentation skills as well as analytical and reflective writing skills. In addition, junior year introduces the writing of a formal research paper. Students compare content and style of various works, delve into specific themes including cultural identity, love/relationships and sacrifice, self-actualization, and the growth and transformation of society through the study of novels and short stories.

Senior students take one of three English classes offered at LHS:

Epic Mythology: This course continues to build on the reading, writing, speaking and listening techniques introduced freshman year and developed through their senior year. Additionally, a more rigorous writing focus is demonstrated through the creation of a research paper. Students will focus on the themes of heroism, fate/destiny/free will, journey, and inner conflict through the study of the Epic and Mythology.

Honors English IV: Honors Reading and Writing-Hybrid: Honors English IV is a semester long, hybrid composition course which allows students to earn their full credit of English in one semester. The course contact time will be split between traditional classroom meetings and a variety of online responsibilities. The course provides students will an opportunity to develop their communication skills by learning to write in different modes. The course teaches students how to effectively use evidence to support opinions and to challenge ideas in written and oral discussion. Additionally, students learn how to research effectively using MLA. The culmination of the course is a research paper employing the skills learned throughout the semester.

AP Literature and Composition: This year-long course is designed for the student who has excelled in previous English courses and who desires an academically challenging and integrated study of literature and composition in preparation for college. Course materials include significant Greek works and various writings of Western and world literature. Emphasis is placed on the critical analysis of literature and the development of the effective use of language in writing and speaking.

Fine Arts-Visual and Performing

In prekindergarten, our students begin to play with line, shape, color, form, texture, and space while creating artwork with a variety of medium. They also engage in analysis of works of art and learn how artists are illustrators.
Kindergarten students learn to identify types of lines: horizontal, vertical, curved, straight, and diagonal, along with identifying four basic geometric shapes: circle, square, triangle, and rectangle. Students also experience and create with different mediums including Create with clay and/or play dough, colored chalk, crayons, markers, glue, fabric, sandpaper, tissue paper, watercolor paint, finger paint, tempera paint, oil pastels, craft glue (Tacky), Sharpie markers. Students also discuss and view artwork by the following artists: Pablo Picasso, Georgia O’Keefe, Lois Ehlert, Eric Carle and Vincent Van Gogh.
In first grade, our students begin to play with line, shape, color, form, texture, and space while creating artwork with a variety of medium. They also engage in analysis of works of art from artists such as Paul Klee, Joan Miro, Marc Brown and Tomie De Paola.

In second grade, students continue to study and experiment with line, shape, color, form, texture and space. They also analyze different pieces of art from Edward Degas, Michelangelo,  Henri Matisse, Donald Crews, Jan Brett and Brian Wildsmith.

In third grade, students study lines by creating a self-portrait using a variety of lines. They also learn to define shape as organic and geometric, and create both organic and geometric designs. Students continue to play with color including the use of primary, secondary, and tertiary color.

Students create a three-dimensional sculpture ie: origami, paper mache, Tinker Toys, Legos, craft sticks, etc. We also use a variety of mediums including finger and tempera paint, clay, fabric, tissue and construction paper, yarn, pipe cleaners, foam and feathers.Students discuss and view artwork by the Georges Rouault, Henri Rousseau, Raoul Duffy, Claude Monet, and Gerald McDermont.

Beginning in fourth grade, students will use the elements of art to explore and understand the principles of art. The students will study the principles of rhythm and movement, balance, pattern, emphasis, proportion, unity, and contrast. They will define positive and negative space and study space using overlapping and perspective. Students will discuss and analyze the following artists and their works: Henri Matisse, Marc Chagall, Mary Cassett , Vincent Van Gogh, and Maurice Sendak.
In fifth grade, the students continue their study of the principles of art. They will strive to understand the principles of emphasis, proportion, unity, and contrast. They will also create depth in a composition by using perspective. Students will create a still-life design with the emphasis on three-dimensional forms (cube, cone, pyramid, etc. ). Students will study and analyze the work of Georgia O’Keeffe, Fredrick Remington, Winslow Homer, Henri Rousseau, Henry Moore, and Chris VanAllsburg.
Sixth grade art students apply their knowledge of the elements of art (color, line, shape, form, texture) to the artistic world. We advance into studying the principles of art. A variety of media is utilized as each student creates pieces of art demonstrating their understanding of specific skills. Students learn the process of examining artwork aesthetically, focusing on the works of Pablo Picasso, Alexander Calder, Toulouse-Lautrec, Marc Chagall, Henri Matisse, and Claude Monet.
Seventh grade students study the principles of art and demonstrate their understanding by using rhythm and movement, balance, pattern, emphasis, proportion, unit and contrast in designs. Students create a contour line drawing and use direction of line to create movement. Students continue to explore texture and space with collages and poster design. They now create with various media, such as clay. Students discuss the following artists and analyze the elements and principles in their artwork: Michelangelo, Paul Klee, M.C. Escher, Piet Mondrian, and Ansel Adams.
Eighth grade students create symmetrical and asymmetrical balance. Students also use color to create mood and contrast. Students learn how to create depth and demonstrate this through creating a cityscape. Students will discuss the following artists and analyze the elements and principles of their artwork: Wassily Kandinsky, David Hockney, Albert Bierstadt, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, and Jackson Pollock.

Visual: Visual Arts at Lourdes High School (LHS) maintains and promotes growth through creative expression in many forms - painting, drawing, design, ceramics, and sculpture. Starting with introductory level courses and progressing to Advanced Placement (AP) courses for those wishing to pursue an undergraduate degree in visual arts. Our goal is to cultivate and advance the understanding and vitality that visual arts plays in our school and community.

Performing: While LHS has a long and rich tradition of presenting thoughtful drama, entertaining comedy, and remarkable musical theater offered in extracurricular opportunities, we are now developing a strong curriculum of coursework in theater as well. Acting and Stagecraft is the foundational course offered in the Theater Department at LHS. Coursework also includes various aspects and skills necessary to support a strong foundation of theatrical experience -- directing, technical design, audition techniques, dance, etc. Consistent with our intention to develop a highly integrated Fine Arts experience, theatrical opportunities at LHS are often enhanced through work with the material and graphic arts, as well as vocal and instrumental musical experience.

Visual: Visual Arts at Lourdes High School (LHS) maintains and promotes growth through creative expression in many forms - painting, drawing, design, ceramics, and sculpture. Starting with introductory level courses and progressing to Advanced Placement (AP) courses for those wishing to pursue an undergraduate degree in visual arts. Our goal is to cultivate and advance the understanding and vitality that visual arts plays in our school and community.

Performing: While LHS has a long and rich tradition of presenting thoughtful drama, entertaining comedy, and remarkable musical theater offered in extracurricular opportunities, we are now developing a strong curriculum of coursework in theater as well. Acting and Stagecraft is the foundational course offered in the Theater Department at LHS. Coursework also includes various aspects and skills necessary to support a strong foundation of theatrical experience -- directing, technical design, audition techniques, dance, etc. Consistent with our intention to develop a highly integrated Fine Arts experience, theatrical opportunities at LHS are often enhanced through work with the material and graphic arts, as well as vocal and instrumental musical experience.

Visual: Visual Arts at Lourdes High School (LHS) maintains and promotes growth through creative expression in many forms - painting, drawing, design, ceramics, and sculpture. Starting with introductory level courses and progressing to Advanced Placement (AP) courses for those wishing to pursue an undergraduate degree in visual arts. Our goal is to cultivate and advance the understanding and vitality that visual arts plays in our school and community.

Performing: While LHS has a long and rich tradition of presenting thoughtful drama, entertaining comedy, and remarkable musical theater offered in extracurricular opportunities, we are now developing a strong curriculum of coursework in theater as well. Acting and Stagecraft is the foundational course offered in the Theater Department at LHS. Coursework also includes various aspects and skills necessary to support a strong foundation of theatrical experience -- directing, technical design, audition techniques, dance, etc. Consistent with our intention to develop a highly integrated Fine Arts experience, theatrical opportunities at LHS are often enhanced through work with the material and graphic arts, as well as vocal and instrumental musical experience.

Visual: Visual Arts at Lourdes High School (LHS) maintains and promotes growth through creative expression in many forms - painting, drawing, design, ceramics, and sculpture. Starting with introductory level courses and progressing to Advanced Placement (AP) courses for those wishing to pursue an undergraduate degree in visual arts. Our goal is to cultivate and advance the understanding and vitality that visual arts plays in our school and community.

Performing: While LHS has a long and rich tradition of presenting thoughtful drama, entertaining comedy, and remarkable musical theater offered in extracurricular opportunities, we are now developing a strong curriculum of coursework in theater as well. Acting and Stagecraft is the foundational course offered in the Theater Department at LHS. Coursework also includes various aspects and skills necessary to support a strong foundation of theatrical experience -- directing, technical design, audition techniques, dance, etc. Consistent with our intention to develop a highly integrated Fine Arts experience, theatrical opportunities at LHS are often enhanced through work with the material and graphic arts, as well as vocal and instrumental musical experience.

Math

Content coming soon.
Kindergarten students are engaged in math in a series of hands-on, engaging units that helps them expand their mathematical reasoning skills. They learn how to create and solve word problems, estimate, and sort objects by measurable attributes using standard and nonstandard units of measurement. Students will also leave kindergarten being able to produce growing or repeating patterns. In the area of geometry, students will describe basic and three dimensional shapes. Our kindergarten mathematicians also learn to tell time to the hour on both analog and digital clocks as well as sort coins.
Our first grade mathematicians, expand their mathematical reasoning skills by using correct terminology and working with addition and subtraction in word problems. Our students build on number sense by reading, writing, comparing, and ordering numbers 0-120. They also work on place value, number families, and mental computation of addition and subtraction facts. Our students are introduced to algebra, data analysis and statistics, by collecting, recording,
By second grade, students are ready to create and solve both addition and subtraction word problems. They also read, write, compare, and order numbers up to 1000, and count by 2’s, 5’s, 10’s, and 25’s. Students also spend time learning how to tell time and count money. Students also work on algebraic thinking including the commutative property of addition and generate equivalent expressions for a given number. In geometry and spatial sense, students work with the concept of symmetry and learn how to locate points on a coordinate grid and learn about the properties of 3D figures.

In third grade, students learn to use the four operations of math in real-world mathematical problems. Fractions are also a major focus of the year, along with multiplying and dividing number sentences to solve for unknown values. In their studies of geometry, third grade students will learn to identify parallel and perpendicular lines, geometric shapes, and polygons. Finally, students begin to interpret data using frequency tables, bar graphs, picture graphs, and number line plots.

In fourth grade, students extend their understanding of both multiplication and division as well as fractions and decimals. Students also use real world objects to calculate area and angles. Students also continue their studies of probability and statistics by creating tables and charts to represent patterns and relationships in order to solve real world mathematical problems. In order to build algebraic thinking, students solve real world and mathematical problems using number sentences involving multiplication, division, and unknowns.
Fifth grade students study area and volume of triangles, quadrilaterals, and rectangular prisms in various contexts with a variety of tools and strategies. They also expand upon their reasoning skills by calculating mean, median, and range. Fifth grade mathematicians also solve equations with variables using arithmetic properties and order of operations. Along with their expanding algebraic abilities, students also add and subtract fractions, mixed numbers, and decimals.

In sixth grade, logic and reasoning skills are essential parts of our curriculum; we build on the basic computation skills of adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing of whole numbers, decimals, and fractions. We apply our understanding of measurement and geometry to more complex real-life scenarios. We explore integers, percents, proportions, probability, basic linear algebra, geometrical theorems, and basic statistics.

Math provides our seventh grade students the ability to deepen their understanding of mathematical reasoning and apply appropriate strategies and approaches to problem solving. Grade 7 focuses on applying algebraic properties to rational numbers, percents, and decimals to solve multi-step equations. We graph solutions of linear equations and inequalities on a number line and linear equations in slope-intercept form.  All junior high students will complete linear algebra by the end of 8th grade.
Grade 8 applies algebraic properties within the real number system to solve linear equations and inequalities and systems of linear equations and inequalities. Students are comfortable with more ways of writing and graphing linear equations before applying similar concepts to quadratic equations and polynomials. Honors students will go into more depth regarding factoring polynomials and simplifying algebraic fractions and radical expressions. The majority of 8th grade students complete Algebra I or Honors Algebra I. A small section of students complete Linear Algebra. These classes prepare them for the subsequent high school math classes.

We offer a comprehensive variety of mathematics courses at each grade level. Students follow a sequence of study starting with algebraic concepts and finishing in calculus. Our freshman students are typically placed in Intermediate Algebra I, Algebra II, or Honors Algebra II based on past performance, testing results, and teacher recommendations. Our sophomore, junior, and senior students are placed in appropriate academic courses based on their achievement through each successive year.

We offer a comprehensive variety of mathematics courses at each grade level. Students follow a sequence of study starting with algebraic concepts and finishing in calculus. Our freshman students are typically placed in Intermediate Algebra I, Algebra II, or Honors Algebra II based on past performance, testing results, and teacher recommendations. Our sophomore, junior, and senior students are placed in appropriate academic courses based on their achievement through each successive year.

We offer a comprehensive variety of mathematics courses at each grade level. Students follow a sequence of study starting with algebraic concepts and finishing in calculus. Our freshman students are typically placed in Intermediate Algebra I, Algebra II, or Honors Algebra II based on past performance, testing results, and teacher recommendations. Our sophomore, junior, and senior students are placed in appropriate academic courses based on their achievement through each successive year.

We offer a comprehensive variety of mathematics courses at each grade level. Students follow a sequence of study starting with algebraic concepts and finishing in calculus. Our freshman students are typically placed in Intermediate Algebra I, Algebra II, or Honors Algebra II based on past performance, testing results, and teacher recommendations. Our sophomore, junior, and senior students are placed in appropriate academic courses based on their achievement through each successive year.

music

While our PreK students do not attend regular music class, music is part of their daily routines in the classroom. Students will sing and play a varied repertoire that includes simple rhythms and melodies.
Students will sing and play a varied repertoire that includes simple rhythms and melodies. Kindergarten students explore the basic elements of music to form a solid foundation for future years.
Students in first grade begin to explore the elements of music by identifying melody, rhythm, harmony, dynamics, tone color, texture, form and their related concepts. Students will also read and notate music. Throughout music class, students sing and play with accurate pitch, rhythm, and express intent. We also focus on learning the characteristics of music from other cultures. Students also identify the characteristics of music from a variety of cultures. Students will improvise or compose to express music ideas using the voice or an instrument.
In second grade, students begin to improvise or compose music to express ideas using the voice or an instrument. Students also continue to sing and play a varied repertoire that includes simple rhythms and melodies. We continue our study of music from different cultures and work to identify the characteristics of each.
In third grade, students begin to describe how elements and their related concepts such as pitch, tempo, canon, and ABA are used in the performance creation or response to music. Students also read and notate music using standard notation such as quarter, half, and eighth notes and rests, the lines and spaces of the treble clef, and time signatures. Students in third grade also sing and play both individually and in groups.

Fourth grade students continue to study the cultural and historical traditions of music. They also improvise with rhythms, melodies, and accompaniments using voice or instruments to express a specific musical idea. Students also learn how to play recorders for classroom performances and public presentations. Students in fourth-grade also  participate in liturgical choir at weekly Masses.

In fifth grade, students revise creative work based on the feedback of others and self reflection. Students also sing alone and in groups such as rounds and part songs or play instruments alone or in a groups. By fifth grade, students are able to justify personal interpretations and reactions to a variety of musical works or performances.

Student in sixth grade, analyze how the elements of music and related concepts are used in the performance, creation or response to music. Students also expand from a historical and cultural look at music to studying music based on the characteristics of a variety of genres and musical styles such as electronic, jazz, opera. We also have a guitar curriculum and all students have the opportunity to participate in the liturgical choir.

Students in seventh grade focus on expressive qualities, tone color, duration, pitch, design, cultural context and movement. Student learning is enhanced through the use of classroom instruments. Students are improvise, compose and arrange new music compositions.
In eighth grade, our students rehearse and perform music from a variety of context alone or with a small group. In small groups, they focus on a two or three part harmony or play an instrument with a group using musical expression.
Our music curriculum includes opportunities for Choir, Concert Band, Marching Band, and Pep Band. Small ensembles include Hi-Lighters (jazz band), Center Street Singers (vocal jazz), Color Guard, Winter Drumline, and Jazz Combos. All ensembles also include private lessons for each student. Classes taught within the department include a Jazz Lab class, Music Accompaniment and a Music Mentorship course that prepares students for first-year music history and theory courses in college.
Our music curriculum includes opportunities for Choir, Concert Band, Marching Band, and Pep Band. Small ensembles include Hi-Lighters (jazz band), Center Street Singers (vocal jazz), Color Guard, Winter Drumline, and Jazz Combos. All ensembles also include private lessons for each student. Classes taught within the department include a Jazz Lab class, Music Accompaniment and a Music Mentorship course that prepares students for first-year music history and theory courses in college.
Our music curriculum includes opportunities for Choir, Concert Band, Marching Band, and Pep Band. Small ensembles include Hi-Lighters (jazz band), Center Street Singers (vocal jazz), Color Guard, Winter Drumline, and Jazz Combos. All ensembles also include private lessons for each student. Classes taught within the department include a Jazz Lab class, Music Accompaniment and a Music Mentorship course that prepares students for first-year music history and theory courses in college.
Our music curriculum includes opportunities for Choir, Concert Band, Marching Band, and Pep Band. Small ensembles include Hi-Lighters (jazz band), Center Street Singers (vocal jazz), Color Guard, Winter Drumline, and Jazz Combos. All ensembles also include private lessons for each student. Classes taught within the department include a Jazz Lab class, Music Accompaniment and a Music Mentorship course that prepares students for first-year music history and theory courses in college.

science

Content coming soon.

In Kindergarten, we believe that is is necessary to inspire creativity and curiosity that is natural in our students. Therefore, our science curriculum focuses on engaging students in asking questions, making observations, and conducting experiments. As part of our Franciscan charism, we focus on a Green STEM approach to science, integrating care and concern for God’s creation, with science, technology, engineering, and math.

Our first grade students delve into the world of science in a hands-on, integrated approach to learning and investigation. Throughout the year, students will plan and conduct an investigation to show sound can make matter vibrate, and sound can be used to communicate. They also will conduct observations of light, including the sun, moon, and stars during different times of the year. Our unique Green STEM curriculum, encourages students to observe different habitats to see what plant and animals needs to survive and grow. They also compare and contrast the characteristics between plants and their parents.
Second grade brings our Green STEM to life for students by asking to to develop a simple model to show how seeds are dispersed. Second graders also conduct an investigation to determine if plants need sunlight and water to grow. They also use information to show how wind and water change the shape of a land and describe different properties of matter. The classroom instruction is fun, hands-on, and engaging. Students also learn about different states of matter: solid, liquid and gas.
By third grade, our students are ready to make predictions and ask questions based on observations. For example, they will ask questions to determine the cause and effect relationships of electric or magnetic interactions between objects. Third grade students will also measure an object’s motion to notice a pattern that can be used to predict future motion. Our students further their Green STEM understanding, by developing models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles, while share some similarities.
Fourth grade science focuses on generating and comparing multiple solutions, applying scientific ideas to engineering concepts, and identifying evidence through observation and measurement. Students grow these critical thinking skills throughout the year through numerous hands-on learning activities, experiments, and simulations. The Rochester Catholic Schools structure our science curriculum in an integrated approach, combining environmental studies, science, technology, engineering, and math into seamless lessons to deepen our students curiosity and understanding.
Fifth grade students have the foundation from earlier grades to take their science reasoning and critical thinking skills to a new level. In fifth grade, students spend time studying matter and substances. They also spend time investigating gravity, and create models to describe that matter is made of particles too small to be seen. Students also work on representing data in graphical displays to reveal patterns.
In sixth grade, the focus for the year is on the area of physical science. Students are immersed in the study of matter, waves, energy and time. This is their first formal study of chemistry and they develop models to describe molecules and their structure. Also in sixth grade is the Project Lead The Way (PLTW) unit called Design and Modeling. In this unit, students work in teams to solve problems and understand the influence of creativity and innovation in their lives. They work in teams to design a playground and furniture and they produce a portfolio to showcase their innovative solutions.
Our seventh grade students focus on the area of life science. They study scientific classification, cell structure and function, heredity, human body systems, plant and animal life, and microorganisms. A unique aspect of our seventh grade science curriculum is our Project Lead The Way (PLTW) module entitled “Medical Detectives.” In this module, students explore the biomedical sciences through hands-on projects and labs that require the students to solve a variety of medical mysteries. Students investigate medical careers, vital signs, diagnosis and treatment of diseases, as well as human body systems such as the nervous system.
Eighth grade science focus on earth and space science. We continue our focus on Green STEM with student asking question about the impact of humans on the environment and design a method of monitoring and minimizing that impact. They also analyze and interpret data on natural hazards to forecast future catastrophic events. Students also study plate tectonics, rocks and minerals, weather, and astronomy.
Freshmen take Principles of Science. In this course, students explore topics traditionally found in a first year physics course. Emphasis, however, is on developing conceptual understanding and exposing students to some of the major concepts of engineering. Students have an opportunity to investigate engineering and high-tech careers and to develop skills and understanding of physics concepts. Students employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. They develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges. Science process skills including data representation are introduced early and used throughout the year. Students also learn how to document their work and communicate their solutions to peers and members of the professional community. Topics include motion, forces, momentum, energy, electricity, magnetism, sound, and optics. This is a Project Lead The Way course. This is a Project Lead The Way course.

Chemistry: This course introduces and develops chemical concepts within a real-world context. Emphasis is on the molecular nature of matter and how changes in matter are observed, described, and symbolized. Science process skills including data recording, data analysis, lab report writing, and algebraic problem-solving are used throughout the year. Concepts include properties and types of matter; formulas, equations, and the mole; atomic and molecular structure; chemical bonding; chemical and heat energy; and behavior of gases. These concepts are addressed through units on water, materials, petroleum, and the atmosphere.

Honors Chemistry This course is designed to fully prepare students who have a serious interest in science, medicine, or engineering for college level chemistry. Emphasis is on chemical principles and theories, applied mathematics, and quantitative laboratory work and data-analysis. Topics include: stoichiometry, kinetic molecular theory, modern atomic theory, chemical bonding, chemistry, and thermo-chemistry. Students must have mature study habits and the ability to work and learn independently.

Health and Human Body Systems: This class focuses on preparing students in the biomedical science field. Students examine the interactions of human body systems as they explore identity, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. To gain a better understanding of overall health and wellness, students will build organs and tissues on a skeletal Maniken®; use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration; and take on the roles of biomedical professionals to solve real-world medical cases. This class fulfills the Health requirement. This is a Project Lead The Way course.

Biology This course will develop biological concepts at a deeper level based on a solid understanding of basic physics and chemistry. This course will investigate, in depth, studies of different concepts such as biochemistry, cellular biology, genetics, biological diversity, evolutionary process, and various ecological concepts. These concepts will be investigated through an inquiry approach, which is laboratory based. This course fulfills the Biology requirement for graduation.

Introduction to Engineering Design In this course, students use 3D solid modeling design software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems. Students will learn how to document their work and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community. The major focus of the IED course is to expose students to the design process, research and analysis, teamwork, communication methods, global and human impacts, engineering standards and technical documentation. This is a Project Lead The Way course.

Honors Biomedical Sciences Students investigate the human body systems and various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia and infectious diseases. They determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person, and investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, medicine, research processes and bioinformatics. Key biological concepts including homeostasis, metabolism, inheritance of traits and defense against disease are embedded in the curriculum. Engineering principles including the design process, feedback loops and the relationship of structure to function are also incorporated. This course is designed to provide an overview of all the courses in the Biomedical Sciences Program and lay the scientific foundation for subsequent courses. This course is required for AP Biology. This is a Project Lead The Way course.

AP Biology This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. As such, students taking this course should have a very strong interest in biology and possess the ability to learn independently outside of regularly scheduled class time.

Honors Anatomy and Physiology This year-long honors course focuses on the human body and how it functions. It covers the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardio-vascular, lymphatic, digestive, and respiratory systems in considerable depth with an emphasis on anatomical and physiological lab experiences. Students will be expected to be mature and professional as the curriculum covers comparative anatomy dissections and numerous practical examinations. Additionally, students will be exposed to numerous field trips and experiences at the Mayo Clinic through their Career Awareness Department. This course is highly recommended for students who wish to pursue a possible career in any health-science related field.

Environmental Biology Would you like to experience Science through an Outdoor Classroom? Does working cooperatively with Cascade Meadow Wetlands and Environmental Science Center sound like fun? This course is designed to investigate Environmental Biology at a local level and see how our actions both positively and negatively affect our surroundings. The class will extensively utilize the outdoor resources at Cascade Meadow Wetlands and Environmental Science Center located next to the Lourdes Campus. Students will be outdoors doing fieldwork on a regular basis to learn about our ever-changing Environment. Watersheds, Wetlands, and Energy Conservation will be the three main themes this course will emphasize while approaching Environmental Biology.

Physics and AP Physics This course is designed to be equivalent to an introductory non-calculus based college physics course. Students taking this course need to have a strong interest in physics and engineering, and possess the ability to learn independently outside of the classroom.

social studies

Content coming soon.
Kindergarten social studies focuses on identifying family and community in students’ own lives. Students explain value that are associated with classroom rules, discuss traditions of past families to present families, and use Bible stories to guide us in our relationships with others. They also begin to sequence events with beginning, middle and end of events, and describe symbols, songs, and traditions that identify our nation and state.
In first grade, students study and explain why rules and responsibilities are important in our communities and classrooms. They also learn to explain needs versus wants and identify individuals who provide goods and services. Students construct timelines of different personal and family events and illustrate maps of familiar places. Students also use Bible stories to discuss how God teaches us to be good stewards of creation.
In second grade, students learn the importance of rules and responsibilities in their home, classroom, Church, and community, and they discuss how people in a community share goods, services, and resources to accommodate needs and wants. Students now create timelines of historical events and compare and contrast the similarities and differences of cultures. In geography, they discuss how human and physical characteristics of a place determine where people live and work. Students also study how our national documents, symbols, songs, locations, and government officials uniquely identify our nation.
Third grade social studies brings an awareness for students of the roles and responsibilities of the branches and levels of government. They also use critical thinking skills to compare and contrast two different accounts of a historical event. Students also study how the actions of individuals or groups have helped shape the world around them. These individuals include Saints, world leaders, church leaders, community leaders, and other influential individuals. SWBAT apply principles of rules, rights and responsibilities to problems in our democratic society. When studying economics, students study how decisions are made when trading, earning, saving, spending, and tithing. They also study and discuss the role of consumers and producers in different historical periods and different types of communities.
In fourth grade, students focus on the different regions of the United States. They construct timelines to show the progression of and reasons for the settlement of the various regions of the US at different points in time. In the area of civics and government, students study the major roles and responsibilities of elected and appointed leaders in the community, state, national, and tribal governments. Students also analyze various types of maps including overlaying thematic maps, photographs, and satellite images of USA, Canada, and Mexico incorporating the TODALS (title, orientation, date, author, legend/key, scale) basics.
In fifth grade, students move from studying the geography of North America, to focusing on the history of the formation of the United States.Specifically, students compare and contrast various motivations of European nations for exploring and settling the new world, and they describe the impact different cultures and the Catholic Church had on the development of the United States. Students spend time studying the American Revolution, the Federal Government, and our Constitution.

Sixth grade brings a focus on the state of Minnesota. Students study the history, geography, government, and economics associated with our state. Students use primary and secondary sources to analyze an historical event in Minnesota. Students spend time studying the lives of Minnesotan Native American people and examine the effect of missionaries on the Native American cultures in Minneota. With each unit of study, we focus on historical cause and effects, geographical impacts, economic strengths and challenges brought to MN, along with civic responsibilities as citizens of Minnesota. In addition, knowledge of world, national, state, and local current events are areas of discussion and debate.

Seventh grade social studies focuses on the history of the United States after 1800. They spend time studying the United States from the early days, through the Civil War, both World Wars, the Great Depression, the Civil Rights era and into the present. Through all of this, students work to distinguish how the philosophies, structures, and influences have changed over time in the United States and differentiate between the branches of government and the role of historical events in shaping our current governmental functions.
Eighth grade social studies turns the focus to a global view. Students study different areas around the world to compare and contrast how culture and geographic location affects governmental philosophies, and social global interaction. They also examine the operation and function of the government and the role of individual citizens and current events. Students also analyze the connections and interactions between environmental features and human activity on a global level.

Ninth Grade World History is divided into classes: World History I and World History II.

Concentrating on Africa, the Middle East, and Asia, World History I coordinates life perspectives from these regions of our world. World History I analyzes the lifestyles of the first humans and follows the culture and movement of these early populations. This course will provide an in-depth comparison between the past and present. The social, political, religious, and economic realities of these regions will help to explain what life has been and is like for these people.

World History II Concentrating on Europe and Latin America, World History II coordinates a historical perspective and current events in a geographic setting. This course begins with the time period of 1000 AD and concentrates on the Columbian Exchange and subsequent changes for both Europe and Latin America from 1500-1945. There will be an emphasis on the social, political, religious, and economic exchanges that enveloped Europe through the world wars. A combination of projects, class discussions, outside readings, lectures, and videos are utilized to look at Europe in a unique and innovative manner.

Human Geography is a semester long class that studies processes and patterns that exist in our world due to human development and activity. Human Geography studies how humans affect and have been affected by the environment. An in-depth analysis of population demographics, such as China’s one child policy and gender imbalance, will be infused with critical mathematical analysis of population statistics. Students will learn how the international community is organized politically and the role that politics plays in human development helping students form a geopolitical understanding of the world, such as the importance of the Suez Canal. Students will understand how human settlement is determined, from the Tsetse Fly Belt and its effect on religious development on the African continent to the cultural borders that have emerged between India and Pakistan. Students will understand the importance of resources to human settlement and interaction, focusing on international and local issues, such as the many lawsuits that have emerged in the southwest region of the United States. Current events will be stressed in this class, using this information to connect to the core geographical concept of globalization. This course is required for graduation.

AP Human Geography is a yearlong course for sophomores in which students will study how geographical concepts can be employed to solve real world problems regarding population demographics, spatial layout, urban design, and the effect that human settlement and activity has on the environment and the implication of those effects on humans. This class is focused on identifying patterns and processes. Students will be able to critically read and analyze maps and graphs to determine what data and conclusions can be found within. We will be connecting events, both locally and internationally to one another to determine correlation and/or causation. Globalization will drive this course; we will study what is unique about situations while also studying what common threads exist in various situations.

Understanding the history of the United States is essential if our representative democracy is to continue. United States History I and II help students make connections between our present society and the rich heritage of our country. Both courses focus on major political, economic, military, religious, social and cultural events in our history. Students will work on acquiring historical critical thinking skills such as chronological reasoning, comparison and contextualization of eras, crafting historical arguments and historical interpretation and synthesis. Students will read a wide array of primary and secondary sources to enhance these historical thinking skills. A variety of learning styles and activities are used in conjunction with a survey textbook and supplementary materials. Current event issues are discussed relevant to course content.

AP US History The AP US History course surveys the history of the United States from 1492 to modern times. The primary focus of the course provides students with an opportunity to develop the ability to analyze and express historical understanding in writing. The course is intended to approximate an introductory lecture and discussion course typically taken within the first two years of college or university study. This course will provide students with the skills needed to think, write, and express historical data critically.

Sociology This elective course evaluates the human interaction and decision making processes that are critical to society. An everyday examination of society and its norms will help explain human interaction. Course content will focus on the role of the individual in various group dynamics in one’s culture such as family and the workplace. Topics such as population change, education, poverty, crime, and gender will be analyzed. Statistics, case studies, and research will help students define these social issues within our society.

Psychology This elective course attempts to address these questions and more as students investigate selected topics within the diverse field of psychology. The primary topics of study include: learning, intelligence, language, sleep and dreams, memory, personality, and mental disorders. An overall view of the field of psychology, as well as a research methodology unit is included. Demonstrations, simulations, case studies, and video clips will provide students with an opportunity to evaluate psychological theory.

Economics Students in the 21st Century must have an essential set of reasoning and decision-making skills for the personal economic choices they will be facing throughout their lives. In addition, they will be living in and be impacted by a rapidly, ever-changing, competitive global economy. To this end, this economics course will prepare students to make rational economic choices both in their own lives and for the greater community. This course will focus on the fundamental elements of economics including micro and macro economics, with an emphasis on real world applications. A combination of projects, class discussions, outside readings, speakers, research, and videos will help students understand key economic principles. This course is required for graduation.

Government (6070) Gr.12

1st or 2nd Semester .5 Credit

It has been stated that democracy will succeed only if its citizens are educated. To that end, this course endeavors to educate students about the political processes in the United States. Students will examine the structures, functions, and relationships between America’s local, state, and federal governments. In addition, the complex division of power between the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the federal government will be investigated. The role and effect of political parties on government business and the popular vote will be researched. The Constitution of the United States, its development, structure, application, and interpretation by the United States Supreme Court, is also an integral part of this course. News events are used extensively to assist students in developing an awareness of the current political and social issues that affect their daily lives. This course is required for graduation.

AP Psychology AP Psychology is a rigorous and challenging college-level class that encourages students to understand more about themselves and their peers. This study of behavior and mental processes will require student mastery of technical reading and writing as it relates to key course concepts. Course content includes research methods, consciousness, motivation and emotion, personality, and much more!

Sociology This elective course evaluates the human interaction and decision making processes that are critical to society. An everyday examination of society and its norms will help explain human interaction. Course content will focus on the role of the individual in various group dynamics in one’s culture such as family and the workplace. Topics such as population change, education, poverty, crime, and gender will be analyzed. Statistics, case studies, and research will help students define these social issues within our society.

Psychology This elective course attempts to address these questions and more as students investigate selected topics within the diverse field of psychology. The primary topics of study include: learning, intelligence, language, sleep and dreams, memory, personality, and mental disorders. An overall view of the field of psychology, as well as a research methodology unit is included. Demonstrations, simulations, case studies, and video clips will provide students with an opportunity to evaluate psychological theory.

Business/Technology

Content coming soon.
Our kindergarten students focus on technology basics such as caring for technology, sharing resources, and working with others. Students will create unique digital pieces and use technology as a tool for learning.
In the Rochester Catholic Schools, we believe technology is not only a curriculum but also a tool that teachers can use to personalize and differentiate student learning. In first grade, students work to collaborate with another student while utilizing digital resources. They also learn basic functions of saving and accessing files, applications, and resources across multiple devices. They also begin to learn the basics of research while maintaining safety online and discuss the importance of being a good digital citizen.
To be prepared for a rapidly changing world, we strive to prepare our students with the essential 21st century skills of creativity, communication, collaboration, and critical thinking. We also give them a solid foundation of technology skills. In second grade, students learn how to manipulate graphics, and capture audio and visual pictures and videos. Students also use digital sources to locate information and report results.
In third grade, students use technology to show their thinking and learning. Therefore, they create a multimedia product using images, video, and/or audio. They also utilize proper formatting and editing techniques for both presentations and word processed documents. Throughout all of their research, they learn how to protect personal information online and how to use Creative Commons licensed resources and images.
Fourth grade technology curriculum enables students to create an original work that incorporates both hyperlinks and videos. Students also continue to work on collaborating with peers online. They also learn how to use spreadsheets and work on keyboarding skills.These skills and lessons are integrated into classroom curriculum to enhance and bring to life learning for all students. Students also begin keyboarding work.
By fifth grade, students are ready to build on their foundational skills to use technology to predict and forecast results based on data, collaborate as a team to solve a problem, and analyze sources for reliability and bias. The goal of this curriculum is to engage learners in active thinking and problem solving.
Our sixth grade students learn to select the appropriate digital tool to create a product to show mastery of content. They also develop cultural understanding and global awareness through technology. Our students also learn how to analyze and cite resources appropriate based on validity and reliability. We integrate technology throughout the curriculum and utilize Google Apps for Education, Infinite Campus, and other Web 2.0 applications to enhance student learning. We also use Infinite Campus and practice keyboarding weekly.
The technology and computer skills curriculum is integrated throughout the day for our students so that they can use technology when appropriate to demonstrate understanding, collaborate with peers, and creatively interact in the classroom. In seventh grade, our students focus on the ethical use of digital media and learn the power of technology and social media to impact the world in a positive way. Students also work on researching, using databases, creating and using spreadsheets, and manipulating graphics.
In eighth grade, we strive to create students who are independent thinkers and problem-solvers. Therefore, the technology curriculum focuses on helping students synthesize information and apply to a new idea, collaborate with learners from other cultures, and use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions to problems.

The Lourdes High School Business and Technology Department offers courses that prepare students for university level business majors and/or majors that have a business element as part of their overall curriculum. In addition, the Business and Technology Department offers courses to prepare students to be knowledgeable in personal finances and technologically literate.  Business and technology courses build an academic foundation for critical thinking, community collaboration, practical engagement, and future success in a business/media driven culture.

The Lourdes High School Business and Technology Department offers courses that prepare students for university level business majors and/or majors that have a business element as part of their overall curriculum. In addition, the Business and Technology Department offers courses to prepare students to be knowledgeable in personal finances and technologically literate.  Business and technology courses build an academic foundation for critical thinking, community collaboration, practical engagement, and future success in a business/media driven culture.

The Lourdes High School Business and Technology Department offers courses that prepare students for university level business majors and/or majors that have a business element as part of their overall curriculum. In addition, the Business and Technology Department offers courses to prepare students to be knowledgeable in personal finances and technologically literate.  Business and technology courses build an academic foundation for critical thinking, community collaboration, practical engagement, and future success in a business/media driven culture.

The Lourdes High School Business and Technology Department offers courses that prepare students for university level business majors and/or majors that have a business element as part of their overall curriculum. In addition, the Business and Technology Department offers courses to prepare students to be knowledgeable in personal finances and technologically literate.  Business and technology courses build an academic foundation for critical thinking, community collaboration, practical engagement, and future success in a business/media driven culture.

Physical Education/Health

Content coming soon.
An essential life skill is learning how to properly care for your spiritual, emotional, and physical health. In physical education classes, we teach our kindergarten through second grade students the basics of personal health and safety. We also focus on different skills and strategies for sports and games.
An essential life skill is learning how to properly care for your spiritual, emotional, and physical health. In physical education classes, we teach our kindergarten through second grade students the basics of personal health and safety. We also focus on different skills and strategies for sports and games.
An essential life skill is learning how to properly care for your spiritual, emotional, and physical health. In physical education classes, we teach our kindergarten through second grade students the basics of personal health and safety. We also focus on different skills and strategies for sports and games.
In the intermediate years, our physical education and health curriculum expands to include more skills and strategies for sports and games. Examples are how to strike, propel, and receive. Students also participate in track and field events, along with fitness testing and learning about personal health and safety.

In the intermediate years, our physical education and health curriculum expands to include more skills and strategies for sports and games. Examples are how to strike, propel, and receive. Students also participate in track and field events, along with fitness testing and learning about personal health and safety.

In the intermediate years, our physical education and health curriculum expands to include more skills and strategies for sports and games. Examples are how to strike, propel, and receive. Students also participate in track and field events, along with fitness testing and learning about personal health and safety.
Students in grades six through eight, continue to focus on personal health, safety, and wellness. Students have physical education class every other day to encourage physical, emotional, social, and spiritual health. Students learn to work together as a team, focus on learning how to win and learning how to handle failure. Cooperation and problem solving are essential skills that we try to nurture in our students.
Students in grades six through eight, continue to focus on personal health, safety, and wellness. Students have physical education class every other day to encourage physical, emotional, social, and spiritual health.
Students in grades six through eight, continue to focus on personal health, safety, and wellness. Students have physical education class every other day to encourage physical, emotional, social, and spiritual health.

As part of educating the whole child, Lourdes High School (LHS) is committed to developing the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual health and wellness of our students. A student must participate in the physical education curriculum during their freshman, sophomore, and junior years at LHS. Students also have the opportunity to engage in a variety of elective courses that include: Advanced First Aid and CPR, Co-ed Weight Training, Girls Weight Training, Lifetime Fitness, and Sports Officiating.

As part of educating the whole child, Lourdes High School (LHS) is committed to developing the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual health and wellness of our students. A student must participate in the physical education curriculum during their freshman, sophomore, and junior years at LHS. Students also have the opportunity to engage in a variety of elective courses that include: Advanced First Aid and CPR, Co-ed Weight Training, Girls Weight Training, Lifetime Fitness, and Sports Officiating.

As part of educating the whole child, Lourdes High School (LHS) is committed to developing the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual health and wellness of our students. A student must participate in the physical education curriculum during their freshman, sophomore, and junior years at LHS. Students also have the opportunity to engage in a variety of elective courses that include: Advanced First Aid and CPR, Co-ed Weight Training, Girls Weight Training, Lifetime Fitness, and Sports Officiating.

As part of educating the whole child, Lourdes High School (LHS) is committed to developing the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual health and wellness of our students. A student must participate in the physical education curriculum during their freshman, sophomore, and junior years at LHS. Students also have the opportunity to engage in a variety of elective courses that include: Advanced First Aid and CPR, Co-ed Weight Training, Girls Weight Training, Lifetime Fitness, and Sports Officiating.

Religion

In prekindergarten, students explore the idea that God loves them. They learn to celebrate their relationships with Jesus by loving and caring for others. Prekindergarten students learn that we celebrate Jesus’s birth at Christmas and His death and resurrection at Easter. Through Bible stories, role plays, prayer and conversation, students learn about the Holy Family, creation and angels.
In Kindergarten, students learn that God is our Creator. They focus on loving God, caring for and serving others as a way to show our love for God. Students discuss the 10 Commandments, the Golden Rule, and practicing charity. Students are introduced to the seven sacraments. Throughout the day, the students participate in many types of formal and informal prayer.
First grade students learn that they are children of God through Baptism. They discuss how God created everything, and that we must care for God, ourselves, and others. Students learn to use prayer to talk to God. Throughout the year, students participate in Mass, as well as formal and informal prayer. In first grade, students begin planning and leading Mass.
To prepare to receive the sacraments of Holy Communion and First Reconciliation, our second grade students spend much of the year studying these two areas. They learn that Reconciliation is the Sacrament of Healing, and that Eucharist is the source and summit of Christian life. Students also come to know God as Creator, Jesus as Brother, and Holy Spirit as Guide. They study the Profession of Faith. Students also focus on loving God and others, serving others and practicing charity. Throughout the year, students participate in Mass, as well as formal and informal prayer.
In third grade, students come to know that our membership in the Catholic Church includes worship and discipleship. Third graders also learn about the history of the Church, and study Church leaders, the Sacraments, and the gifts and fruits of the Holy Spirit. They also learn about the Blessed Trinity, Blessed Mary as the Mother of Jesus, and Jesus as the Son of God, fully human and fully divine. Students also begin to understand that everyone is made in the image of God. Students practice charity by serving others, and they learn to use Scripture to learn about God and their faith. Third graders begin to understand our freedom to choose between good and evil through an introduction to the Ten Commandments.
Our fourth grade curriculum focuses on God’s Commandments as laws to guide us in loving God and others. Students also identify God as Creator, Jesus as the Son of God, Jesus as Brother, God as Father, Son and Holy Spirit, and Mary as the mother of Jesus. Fourth grade students also study the Seven Sacraments and symbols of the Catholic Church. Students identify the Eucharist as the source and summit of Christian Life. Students continue to participate in formal and informal prayer. Circle of Grace is introduced to students at the beginning of the school year. Students also explore the importance of a family through our Family Life curriculum.
Fifth grade focuses on the Sacraments of the Catholic Church. While they continue to study the Profession of Faith, they now add the teaching of Holy Spirit as Guide, the Good News of Jesus Christ, and the Celebration of the Christian Mystery. Students also learn about Ten Commandments, the Beatitudes, and Virtues.
The focus of sixth grade religion is on building right relationships with God and others. Through the study of Scripture, students read the Book of Genesis through the Book of Kings and analyze God's relationship with His people. Students seek to connect their own lives with the lives of the people in the Old Testament, recognizing the virtues in action. Throughout the Scripture studies, students begin to parallel the teachings in the Old Testament to the teaching in the New Testament. Students also learn the precepts of the Catholic Church.

In seventh grade, the curriculum emphasizes living as members of the Catholic Church, and deepens the students' knowledge of the Church's teaching and traditions. The Gospel of Matthew, Book of Wisdom and the Poetry Books of the Bible become the focus of Scripture study.

In eighth grade, students study discipleship through God’s Teaching and Sacraments with emphasis on Jesus and the Gospels. Students study the Gospels of Mark, Luke and John, as well as the life of Paul and the Apostolic Church and the Church of Antioch. In eighth grade, students discuss the seven sacraments and symbols of the Catholic Church and are able to articulate the the Eucharist is the source and summit of Christian Life. They also learn the rite of Christian burial as fulfillment of Baptism.

Religion I: Catholic Foundations

Ninth grade students take two, semester long classes during their first year at Lourdes.

Catholic Foundations I: Introduction to Scriptureintroduces students to the basics of our Catholic faith and tradition. The course covers an examination of the Covenant story of the Scriptures.

Catholic Foundations II: Dignity of the Human Person covers multiple facets and issues regarding the human person that is created in the “image and likeness of God.” This course will concentrate on Catholic moral teachings, Catholic social teachings, Theology of the Body, conscience formation, and decision making in the area of family life and relationships.

Religion II: Christology

Tenth grade students focus on Christology. Christology focuses on the life, words, and teachings of Jesus. We explore the Gospel texts and other scriptural references in an attempt to better understand Jesus Christ and his connection to all humanity. During second semester, we will include saints and theologians as part of our investigation.

Religion III: Ecclesiology and Church History

Ecclesiology is the study of the life of the Church. The Church as both communion and mission forms the framework for this course’s focus. Different themes regarding the Church are examined including discipleship, charisms, ministries, vocations, and liturgy. Special emphasis is also placed upon the seven Sacraments and role of the Word in the Life of the Church. Ecclesiology attends the social and divine qualities of the Church by learning how God relates to the Church and her members and how the members relate to one another.

Church History will enlighten students regarding the journey of Christian identity from its prophetic roots in biblical tradition through the social, political, and cultural challenges of historical discernment. Particular attention is paid to the role of personal responsibility in one’s own commitment to the endurance of the Catholic faith.

Franciscan FoundationsThis religion course takes the place of a regularly scheduled religion course for one semester Junior or Senior year. The course will enable students to grow in their Catholic identity with a focus on Franciscan theology. Students will explore the lives of Francis and Clare of Assisi as models of faith within a historical context and discern connections to our own lived experience. Students who participate in this course understand that it is designed to culminate in a pilgrimage to Rome and Assisi, Italy. This course is offered on alternate years; the next offering will be in 2016-2017.

Religion IV

Christian Life and Relationshippresents students with opportunities to integrate what they have discovered in earlier courses. Senior students are expected to confront significant questions of life and relationship, to articulate their faith in mature and responsible ways and to demonstrate a concern for the Image of God that defines the dignity for each person.

Catholic Social Justice examines the necessary relationship between love and justice in the Christian moral life. The Christian response to God’s love and the call to take an active role in participating in the work of God are key themes in the course. Catholic Social Justice also presents the fundamental convictions of Catholic social teaching highlighting the issues of poverty, racism, gender and human rights. This course also includes a required community service component for all students.

Franciscan FoundationsThis religion course takes the place of a regularly scheduled religion course for one semester Junior or Senior year. The course will enable students to grow in their Catholic identity with a focus on Franciscan theology. Students will explore the lives of Francis and Clare of Assisi as models of faith within a historical context and discern connections to our own lived experience. Students who participate in this course understand that it is designed to culminate in a pilgrimage to Rome and Assisi, Italy. This course is offered on alternate years; the next offering will be in 2016-2017.

World Language

Students do not have formal world language instruction in preschool-4th grade.
Students do not have formal world language instruction in preschool-4th grade.
Students do not have formal world language instruction in preschool-4th grade.
Students do not have formal world language instruction in preschool-4th grade.
Students do not have formal world language instruction in preschool-4th grade.
Students do not have formal world language instruction in preschool-4th grade.
Fifth grade is when our students begin to take Spanish classes. In this year, students, spend time studying the impact of Hispanic cultures in the United States and around the world.They also learn how to use greetings in a variety of situations, discuss weather and calendar items, and recognize frequently used school items. They learn how to respond to basic commands, and use and apply the alphabet. They study colors and numbers. In their grammatical studies, they define and identify cognates, and identify and choose correct noun/adjective agreement.
In sixth grade, student learn how to express themselves in Spanish using the verbs gustar and ser. They also learn to express likes and dislikes in regards to foods and activities. They progress to being able to describe their physical selves and personality traits using both adjectives and the verbs ser and tener. Finally, they use prepositions to describe locations and express things about their school and daily routines by using tener, estar, and -ir and -ar verbs in the present tense.
In seventh grade Spanish, students learn how to express things about likes and dislikes with food and family by using estar and tener as well as -er and -ir verbs in the present tense. They work on conjugating regular verbs, and also study irregular verbs such as ser and estar. Students learn how to ask and answer question using interrogatives, describe relationships between family members using possessive adjectives, and use numbers up to a million. They learn how to discuss their homes, talk about chores, and even plan a party in Spanish.
By the end of eighth grade, students are able to express things about health, sports, and body parts by using jugar, saber, conocer, and the personal “a.” Students also learn how to make a phone call, send an email, and use the preterit tense of verbs to express things about vacations and leisure activities.
Rochester Catholic Schools believes the ability to communicate in more than one language is a critical need for today’s students as they enter into a multinational, multicultural world. The Lourdes High School World Language Department is dedicated to providing students with language skills as prescribed by national and state standards for world language acquisition. As students advance through each level of instruction, they not only acquire literacy in reading, writing, and speaking the target language, they also obtain an appreciation and understanding of diverse cultures. In addition, students are exposed to aspects of Catholic identity that complement the thematic unit as part of their learning process. Learning a second language offers our students a distinct advantage in interacting successfully in the modern global climate. Lourdes High School offers French I-IV, Spanish I-IV, and Latin I-IV. We also offer AP Spanish for 12th grade students.
Lourdes High School believes the ability to communicate in more than one language is a critical need for today’s students as they enter into a multinational, multicultural world. The Lourdes High School World Language Department is dedicated to providing students with language skills as prescribed by national and state standards for world language acquisition. As students advance through each level of instruction, they not only acquire literacy in reading, writing, and speaking the target language, they also obtain an appreciation and understanding of diverse cultures. In addition, students are exposed to aspects of Catholic identity that complement the thematic unit as part of their learning process. Learning a second language offers our students a distinct advantage in interacting successfully in the modern global climate. Lourdes High School offers French I-IV, Spanish I-IV, and Latin I-IV. We also offer AP Spanish for 12th grade students.
Lourdes High School believes the ability to communicate in more than one language is a critical need for today’s students as they enter into a multinational, multicultural world. The Lourdes High School World Language Department is dedicated to providing students with language skills as prescribed by national and state standards for world language acquisition. As students advance through each level of instruction, they not only acquire literacy in reading, writing, and speaking the target language, they also obtain an appreciation and understanding of diverse cultures. In addition, students are exposed to aspects of Catholic identity that complement the thematic unit as part of their learning process. Learning a second language offers our students a distinct advantage in interacting successfully in the modern global climate. Lourdes High School offers French I-IV, Spanish I-IV, and Latin I-IV. We also offer AP Spanish for 12th grade students.
Lourdes High School believes the ability to communicate in more than one language is a critical need for today’s students as they enter into a multinational, multicultural world. The Lourdes High School World Language Department is dedicated to providing students with language skills as prescribed by national and state standards for world language acquisition. As students advance through each level of instruction, they not only acquire literacy in reading, writing, and speaking the target language, they also obtain an appreciation and understanding of diverse cultures. In addition, students are exposed to aspects of Catholic identity that complement the thematic unit as part of their learning process. Learning a second language offers our students a distinct advantage in interacting successfully in the modern global climate. Lourdes High School offers French I-IV, Spanish I-IV, and Latin I-IV. We also offer AP Spanish for 12th grade students.

Guidance and Family Life

Content coming soon.
The purpose of our guidance curriculum is to help students grow emotionally, socially, and academically along with helping them begin to understand careers and vocations. We strive to help students understand that God has a plan for their lives, and to help them find satisfaction and joy in the learning process.
The purpose of our guidance curriculum is to help students grow emotionally, socially, and academically along with helping them begin to understand careers and vocations. We strive to help students understand that God has a plan for their lives, and to help them find satisfaction and joy in the learning process.
The purpose of our guidance curriculum is to help students grow emotionally, socially, and academically along with helping them begin to understand careers and vocations. We strive to help students understand that God has a plan for their lives, and to help them find satisfaction and joy in the learning process. In second grade, the focus in on problem solving in social situations. Students begin to practice how to handle disagreements on their own rather than needing adult intervention right away.
The purpose of our guidance curriculum is to help students grow emotionally, socially, and academically along with helping them begin to understand careers and vocations. We strive to help students understand that God has a plan for their lives, and to help them find satisfaction and joy in the learning process.
The purpose of our guidance curriculum is to help students grow emotionally, socially, and academically along with helping them begin to understand careers and vocations. We strive to help students understand that God has a plan for their lives, and to help them find satisfaction and joy in the learning process.
The purpose of our guidance curriculum is to help students grow emotionally, socially, and academically along with helping them begin to understand careers and vocations. We strive to help students understand that God has a plan for their lives, and to help them find satisfaction and joy in the learning process.
The purpose of our guidance curriculum is to help students grow emotionally, socially, and academically along with helping them begin to understand careers and vocations. In sixth grade, the curriculum focuses on development of independent study skills and habits. We also help students learn how to advocate for themselves, manage their time wisely, and discern their gifts and talents leading into a study of careers and vocations. We strive to help students understand that God has a plan for their lives, and to help them find satisfaction and joy in the learning process.
The purpose of our guidance curriculum is to help students grow emotionally, socially, and academically along with helping them begin to understand careers and vocations. We strive to help students understand that God has a plan for their lives, and to help them find satisfaction and joy in the learning process.
The purpose of our guidance curriculum is to help students grow emotionally, socially, and academically along with helping them begin to understand careers and vocations. We strive to help students understand that God has a plan for their lives, and to help them find satisfaction and joy in the learning process.
Freshmen Guidance With the growing concern about adolescents making positive choices in their lives, the Freshmen Guidance class will examine several of the issues that they will face and discuss appropriate outcomes. Such topics as chemical usage, relationships, stress management, study skills, and family roles will be addressed. Students also have the opportunity to develop personal growth skills and establish goals for their high school years.
Sophomore Guidance Sophomore Guidance will take a twofold approach in its curriculum. The students have an opportunity to continue with their personal growth skills as well as begin to examine the world of work and determine what areas interest them. Understanding their own personalities and applying those to an employment choice is a focus of this class. Students will complete interest skills and values assessments to aid them in career exploration.

Junior Guidance Junior Guidance gives students opportunities to explore their interests and goals as they relate to course selection, post secondary education and career choices. The major units include: Interest, Skills and Values Assessments; Career Exploration; College Entrance Test Preparation and College Search. Students will create a portfolio containing a resume, career plan, and test scores. Completion of the course sets the stage for students to approach their final year of high school with a plan for the future.

Test Preparation

The main goal of this online course is to help juniors develop test-taking skills which they can apply to the PSAT in October and the ACT and SAT later in the school year. Students will become familiar with the format and will practice taking standardized tests within the required time limits. Students will enhance critical reading skills such as determining meanings of words in context, pinpointing main ideas, etc. Math skills, which the students will develop, include reading the problems carefully to determine what is being asked and using math and reasoning to solve the problem. Students will focus on skills in English regarding usage, grammar and rhetoric, and writing. The science section requires attention to skills associated with science such as interpretation and analysis.

Senior Guidance Seniors will continue to explore their post high school options in a variety of ways. Particular attention will be given to the college/university search, as well as college majors and minors, applications, college essays, letters of recommendation, scholarships and financial aid. Additional paths will also be examined. Students will be required to complete an educational resume and senior advisory conference prior to the end of the semester.